Traditional British Apple Crumble

Here’s an old favorite of mine, apple crumble. It’s hard to believe that such a wonderful dessert can be madewith only five ingredients. Stewed Granny Smith apples are topped with a sweet, buttery crumble topping. It’s great with cream, vanilla ice cream or custard. I had never baked this for A until his folks were coming over for dinner. It was well received… they even asked for the recipe.


adapted from perfect apple crumble

serves 2 greedy people, or 3 not-so-greedy people


  • 3 medium-large Granny Smith apples*, peeled, cored and cut into 2.5 cm (1 inch) chunks
  • 125 g (2/3 cups) turbinado sugar
  • 1 clove or cinnamon stick
  • 100 g (2/3 cups) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 60 g (4 tablespoons) salted European butter, chilled, cut into cubes

* My apples weighed 665 g (1.5 lb), and 485 g (1.1 lb) when prepped


1. Place the apples, 3/4 of the sugar and the clove/cinnamon stick in a pan, cover and stew over low heat for 20-30 minutes. Stir gently and occasionally to prevent burning. The cooked apples should be soft, not pureed. Transfer to a baking dish.

2. Preheat oven to 150 C (300 F).

3. Mix the flour, remaining sugar and butter with your fingertips in a bowl until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Sprinkle over the stewed apples. Do not press down.

4. Bake for 30 minutes in the preheated oven or until the top is golden and crunchy on top. Serve warm. Enjoy!


2 thoughts on “Traditional British Apple Crumble

    • That would be great, wouldn’t it? Unfortunately the crumble itself also contains dairy, so it’s a no-no for me. I do enjoy watching other people enjoying it though :).

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